The Initiative

A collection of images and words curated by the R. Buckminster Fuller community.We encourage you to submit any relevant influence that strengthens this pop culture initiative. Please Enjoy.

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C60

Buckminsterfullerene (or buckyball) is a spherical fullerene molecule with the formula C60. It is a cage-like fused-ring structure which resembles a soccer ball, made of twenty hexagons and twelve pentagons, with a carbon atom at the vertices of each polygon and a bond along each polygon edge.

Buckminsterfullerene C60 Molecule

It was first intentionally prepared in 1985 by Harold Kroto, James R. Heath, Sean O’Brien, Robert Curl and Richard Smalley at Rice University. Kroto, Curl and Smalley were awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their roles in the discovery of buckminsterfullerene and the related class of molecules, the fullerenes. The name is an homage to Buckminster Fuller, as C60 resembles his trademark geodesic domes. Buckminsterfullerene is the most common fullerene molecule in terms of natural occurrence, as it can be found in small quantities in soot. Solid and gaseous forms of the molecule have been detected in deep space.

Buckminsterfullerene is the largest matter to have been shown to exhibit wave–particle duality. Its discovery led to the exploration of a new field of chemistry, involving the study of fullerenes.



Read more: C60 | Nanotechnology eLearning Center 

Posted on Tuesday, September 11th 2012

INHOTIM, ONCE AGAIN IN LARGE SCALE
The Institute inaugurates nine works by nationally and internationally acclaimed contemporary artists

Large-scale works of art that could only be built in a place like Inhotim, located 60 km away from Belo Horizonte, Brazil, will be inaugurated in late September and early October. The new works are by the artists Chris Burden, Doug Aitken, Edgard de Souza, Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller, Jorge Macchi, Matthew Barney, Rivane Neuenschwander, Valeska Soares, and Yayoi Kusama. The opening event has been named “Nine New Destinations” and, according to Jochen Volz, Instituto Inhotim’s Artistic-Director and one of the curators, “the idea of destination is the place’s very essence. After all, Instituto Inhotim is not a place one passes by. Inhotim is always a destination.”

pictured: 

de lama lâmina at inhotimmatthew barney brumadinho mgbrazil


read more: http://www.inhotim.org.br/novenovosdestinos/eng/press_news_01.html

Posted on Tuesday, September 11th 2012

Amelia Earhart in Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion Car

via: http://freenorthcarolina.blogspot.com/2012/09/amelia-earhart-in-buckminster-fullers.html

Posted on Tuesday, September 11th 2012

Novum

For its November ‘Arts and Crafts’ issue, graphic design magazine Novum commissioned Hamburg-based design studio Paperlux to create this deformable cover. Inspired by theorist, designer and inventor Buckminster Fuller and his geodesic dome, 15,000 covers were intricately die-cut, allowing them to bend in any direction. The magazine was released in six different colours by a team who chose to ignore budget restraints and craft something unique and beautiful, purely out of passion. The result is this tactile, playful and engaging piece of art that totally breaks print industry conventions.

In our digitalised world, it’s compelling to see traditional media push creative boundaries to encourage people to appreciate the real and tangible. We’ve seen it in the music industry and now with the likes of Wallpaper Magazine’s limited edition covers and this, we’re seeing it in print.

via: http://prote.in/feed/2011/11/novum

Posted on Monday, August 20th 2012

Aquapod
The patented Aquapod™ is a unique containment system for marine aquaculture, suited for rough open ocean conditions and a diversity of species. The Aquapod is constructed of individual triangle net panels fastened together in a spheroid shape. Most Aquapod net panels are made of reinforced high density polyethylene with 80% recycled content and covered with coated galvanized steel wire mesh netting. Individual net panels or groups of panels are modified to accommodate other functions, such as access, feeding, fish transfer, grading, and harvesting. The Aquapod functions as a secure containment system for finfish while submerged or partially surfaced.
via: http://spacecollective.org/matthewspencer/5795/Aquapod

Aquapod

The patented Aquapod™ is a unique containment system for marine aquaculture, suited for rough open ocean conditions and a diversity of species. The Aquapod is constructed of individual triangle net panels fastened together in a spheroid shape. Most Aquapod net panels are made of reinforced high density polyethylene with 80% recycled content and covered with coated galvanized steel wire mesh netting. Individual net panels or groups of panels are modified to accommodate other functions, such as access, feeding, fish transfer, grading, and harvesting. The Aquapod functions as a secure containment system for finfish while submerged or partially surfaced.

via: http://spacecollective.org/matthewspencer/5795/Aquapod

Posted on Monday, August 20th 2012

BMC International Conference 2012


ReVIEWING Black Mountain College 4 September 28-30, 2012Asheville, North Carolina
Thematic Focus: Looking Forward at Buckminster Fuller’s Legacy


eynote Speaker: Allegra Fuller Snyder, daughter of Buckminster Fuller; Director Emerita of the Buckminster Fuller Institute; Professor Emerita of Dance and Dance Ethnology, UCLA
Featured Speaker: Jason McLennan, CEO of the Cascadia Green Building Council; author of the Living Building Challenge, winner of the 2012 Buckminster Fuller Challenge
Featured Speaker: Joseph D. Clinton, President of Clinton International Design Consultants; Synergetics Collaborative; associate of Buckminster Fuller
Featured Speaker: Mel Chin, conceptual visual artist
Featured Speaker: David McConville, media artist; President of the Buckminster Fuller Institute
The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, along with the Buckminster Fuller Institute and the University of North Carolina at Asheville, will present a 3-day conference exploring Buckminster Fuller’s Legacy, including his forward-thinking work during the two summers he was at Black Mountain College (1948 & 1949), his innovative work in architecture, engineering and design science in the decades after BMC, and the work of those who are carrying his ideas forward into the future. In addition to panels and presentations, the conference will include an experiential Design Science Day held outdoors on the UNC Asheville campus on Saturday, September 29th.


for more information: http://www.blackmountaincollege.org/conference

BMC International Conference 2012

ReVIEWING Black Mountain College 4 
September 28-30, 2012
Asheville, North Carolina

Thematic Focus: Looking Forward at Buckminster Fuller’s Legacy

eynote Speaker: Allegra Fuller Snyder, daughter of Buckminster Fuller; Director Emerita of the Buckminster Fuller Institute; Professor Emerita of Dance and Dance Ethnology, UCLA

Featured Speaker: Jason McLennan, CEO of the Cascadia Green Building Council; author of the Living Building Challenge, winner of the 2012 Buckminster Fuller Challenge

Featured Speaker: Joseph D. Clinton, President of Clinton International Design Consultants; Synergetics Collaborative; associate of Buckminster Fuller

Featured Speaker: Mel Chin, conceptual visual artist

Featured Speaker: David McConville, media artist; President of the Buckminster Fuller Institute

The Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center, along with the Buckminster Fuller Institute and the University of North Carolina at Asheville, will present a 3-day conference exploring Buckminster Fuller’s Legacy, including his forward-thinking work during the two summers he was at Black Mountain College (1948 & 1949), his innovative work in architecture, engineering and design science in the decades after BMC, and the work of those who are carrying his ideas forward into the future. In addition to panels and presentations, the conference will include an experiential Design Science Day held outdoors on the UNC Asheville campus on Saturday, September 29th.


for more information: http://www.blackmountaincollege.org/conference

Posted on Monday, August 20th 2012

Modular SPACEPLATES Greenhouse Mimics the Geometry of Sea Urchin Shells

via: inhabitat.com

Posted on Monday, July 9th 2012

June 2012: Buckminster Fuller at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art by Jessica Furseth
Buckminster Fuller: The Utopian ImpulseSan Francisco Museum of Modern Art 151 Third StreetSan Francisco, CA 9410331 March through 29 July 2012‘Radical idealism’ is what Buckminster Fuller called it. It was the 1960s, a time when everything people had taken for granted was up in the air and the future was a place with minimalist design, energy efficient housing and maybe even a colony on the moon. ‘The Utopian Impulse’ is not only an insight into Fuller’s ideas for the future, one where technology and sustainability stands at the centre, but also a picture of what the world could be like if was created through elegant design, inspired by nature and boldly executed with a mandate to make things better.Or maybe it was too much to ask, because by the time the 1980s rolled around, boasting a very different brand of radicalism, people had stopped picturing this fantastical future. So where did the dreams go? At least this is what I am wondering after spending a couple of hours surrounded by the imagination of Buckminster, lovingly displayed at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. While Fuller (1895 - 1983) never lived in the Bay Area, he lectured here extensively, making this exhibition a perfect fit for an area with a unique magnetism for idealists, inventors, non-conformists and dreamers of various ilk. The ‘Inventions’ series consists of 13 drawings patented by Fuller in his mission to create superior solutions. There is the teardrop-shaped car; a design for a rowing boat consisting of two beams and a seat; a base for septic fuel tanks. A photograph shows Fuller next to a dome-shaped building covered in round windows, the most energy-efficient form. Geometrical shapes are repeated everywhere, chosen for practicality and kept for being pleasing to the eye. This is not a coincidence, observed Fuller: “I only think about how to solve the problem. But when I have finished, if the solution is not beautiful, I know it is wrong.” The stand-out piece is the ‘Dymaxion Air-Ocean World Map’, where Fuller has taken a globe and laid it out flat, in triangles. Looking at the world with the North Pole as the centre, you suddenly realise all the land masses link together. Fuller was a fan of the triangle, calling it the only shape that is “inherently stable”, as described in the ‘Synergistic Dictionary’. A selection of the 22,000 entries typed up on index cards are displayed, providing a glimpse into how this man saw the world. Take the entry for ‘Spiral’: “A triangle is a spiral, and is one energy event.” It may seem a little kooky, but there is evidence that Fuller was way ahead of his time, especially with his energy-efficient solutions. The teardrop-shaped car from 1933 had unprecedented fuel efficiency; the ‘4D House’ from 1928 is an hexagonal autonomous dwelling designed to be optimally resource efficient, as well as capable of mass production in factories for off-site assembly.
‘The Utopian Impulse’ also includes pieces by artists and designers whose works are in a similar vein to Fuller. The Ant Farm Collective was established in San Francisco in 1968, a group which expanded the role of architecture to include performance, film, installation and animation. On display is their ‘Convention City’ model from 1978, a dome-shaped suggestion for Texas. There are pamphlets from the Office of Appropriate Technology, established in California in 1976 with the task of assisting state agencies in developing and implementing less costly and energy-saving initiatives. Solar energy, farmers markets and bicycling programmes were among its efforts.  For an exhibition so firmly focused on the future, ‘The Utopian Impulse’ feels distinctly retro. This is probably a natural consequence of styles having changed since the 1960s, but the main element to this feeling is the sneaking awareness that these people, who made this work nearly 40 years ago, may have been more optimistic about the future than we are now. Maybe we know more now, about the limitations of power generation and the complexities of politics, and we are simply resigned to the fact that the future will take a little longer to get here than we had hoped. The ‘Earth Flag’, made in 1969 by Norman La Liberte and John McConnell’s, hangs on the wall; it has a grey and white planet on a blue background. It looks so simple. Or maybe we just have different dreams now, ones which we can actually reach: fewer underwater colonies, just better waste recycling. And energy-neutral housing: amongst a handful of post-millennium works included in the exhibition is IwamotoScott’s ‘Jellyfish House’ from 2005, an intricate architectural model made from mesh, with soft curves like a sea creature. ‘Hydramax Port Machine’ from 2012, bulit by Future Cities Labs, looks like a plant with tentacles, moving softly under water. The building is designed to capture moisture and to store and re-circulate water inside the building. It is not quite “peace on earth” but it is distinctly in the tradition of Fuller, who sought the attention of the individual and not governments; he wanted us to each add our knowledge and resources to build a future we would feel a part of. In 1965, Fuller initiated something he called the ‘World Game’ project. He described it as a data-visualisation system to facilitate global approaches in solving the world’s problems, wanting it to contribute to “mak[ing] the world work, for 100% of humanity, in the shortest possible time, through spontaneous cooperation, without ecological offense or the disadvantage of anyone”. Nowadays we call it the internet. Fuller believed greater access to information would generate more humanitarian problem-solving, and on a good day, that is what the internet does. There is a lot of work to do still, but l think Buckminster Fuller would be excited about what comes next.

Full Article.

June 2012: Buckminster Fuller at San Francisco Museum of Modern Art by Jessica Furseth

Buckminster Fuller: The Utopian Impulse
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art 
151 Third Street
San Francisco, CA 94103
31 March through 29 July 2012

‘Radical idealism’ is what Buckminster Fuller called it. It was the 1960s, a time when everything people had taken for granted was up in the air and the future was a place with minimalist design, energy efficient housing and maybe even a colony on the moon. ‘The Utopian Impulse’ is not only an insight into Fuller’s ideas for the future, one where technology and sustainability stands at the centre, but also a picture of what the world could be like if was created through elegant design, inspired by nature and boldly executed with a mandate to make things better.

Or maybe it was too much to ask, because by the time the 1980s rolled around, boasting a very different brand of radicalism, people had stopped picturing this fantastical future. So where did the dreams go? At least this is what I am wondering after spending a couple of hours surrounded by the imagination of Buckminster, lovingly displayed at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. While Fuller (1895 - 1983) never lived in the Bay Area, he lectured here extensively, making this exhibition a perfect fit for an area with a unique magnetism for idealists, inventors, non-conformists and dreamers of various ilk. 

The ‘Inventions’ series consists of 13 drawings patented by Fuller in his mission to create superior solutions. There is the teardrop-shaped car; a design for a rowing boat consisting of two beams and a seat; a base for septic fuel tanks. A photograph shows Fuller next to a dome-shaped building covered in round windows, the most energy-efficient form. Geometrical shapes are repeated everywhere, chosen for practicality and kept for being pleasing to the eye. This is not a coincidence, observed Fuller: “I only think about how to solve the problem. But when I have finished, if the solution is not beautiful, I know it is wrong.” 

The stand-out piece is the ‘Dymaxion Air-Ocean World Map’, where Fuller has taken a globe and laid it out flat, in triangles. Looking at the world with the North Pole as the centre, you suddenly realise all the land masses link together. Fuller was a fan of the triangle, calling it the only shape that is “inherently stable”, as described in the ‘Synergistic Dictionary’. A selection of the 22,000 entries typed up on index cards are displayed, providing a glimpse into how this man saw the world. Take the entry for ‘Spiral’: “A triangle is a spiral, and is one energy event.” It may seem a little kooky, but there is evidence that Fuller was way ahead of his time, especially with his energy-efficient solutions. The teardrop-shaped car from 1933 had unprecedented fuel efficiency; the ‘4D House’ from 1928 is an hexagonal autonomous dwelling designed to be optimally resource efficient, as well as capable of mass production in factories for off-site assembly.

‘The Utopian Impulse’ also includes pieces by artists and designers whose works are in a similar vein to Fuller. The Ant Farm Collective was established in San Francisco in 1968, a group which expanded the role of architecture to include performance, film, installation and animation. On display is their ‘Convention City’ model from 1978, a dome-shaped suggestion for Texas. There are pamphlets from the Office of Appropriate Technology, established in California in 1976 with the task of assisting state agencies in developing and implementing less costly and energy-saving initiatives. Solar energy, farmers markets and bicycling programmes were among its efforts.  

For an exhibition so firmly focused on the future, ‘The Utopian Impulse’ feels distinctly retro. This is probably a natural consequence of styles having changed since the 1960s, but the main element to this feeling is the sneaking awareness that these people, who made this work nearly 40 years ago, may have been more optimistic about the future than we are now. Maybe we know more now, about the limitations of power generation and the complexities of politics, and we are simply resigned to the fact that the future will take a little longer to get here than we had hoped. The ‘Earth Flag’, made in 1969 by Norman La Liberte and John McConnell’s, hangs on the wall; it has a grey and white planet on a blue background. It looks so simple. 

Or maybe we just have different dreams now, ones which we can actually reach: fewer underwater colonies, just better waste recycling. And energy-neutral housing: amongst a handful of post-millennium works included in the exhibition is IwamotoScott’s ‘Jellyfish House’ from 2005, an intricate architectural model made from mesh, with soft curves like a sea creature. ‘Hydramax Port Machine’ from 2012, bulit by Future Cities Labs, looks like a plant with tentacles, moving softly under water. The building is designed to capture moisture and to store and re-circulate water inside the building. It is not quite “peace on earth” but it is distinctly in the tradition of Fuller, who sought the attention of the individual and not governments; he wanted us to each add our knowledge and resources to build a future we would feel a part of. 

In 1965, Fuller initiated something he called the ‘World Game’ project. He described it as a data-visualisation system to facilitate global approaches in solving the world’s problems, wanting it to contribute to “mak[ing] the world work, for 100% of humanity, in the shortest possible time, through spontaneous cooperation, without ecological offense or the disadvantage of anyone”. Nowadays we call it the internet. Fuller believed greater access to information would generate more humanitarian problem-solving, and on a good day, that is what the internet does. There is a lot of work to do still, but l think Buckminster Fuller would be excited about what comes next.

Full Article.

Posted on Thursday, June 28th 2012

mobuki:

R. Buckminster Fuller

Inventor, Designer, Architect, Theorist (1895-1983)

Driven by the design philosophy of “more for less”,
RICHARD BUCKMINSTER FULLER (1895-1983) worked simultaneously on plans for houses, cars, boats, games, television transmitters and geodesic domes, all of which were designed to be mass-produced using the simplest and most sustainable means possible.

Link-
Richard Buckminster Fuller

A Letter to Bucky

Howdy Bucky,
 I thought I’d catch you up to date, seeing how you’ve been dead for around 29 years. First the not so good news. Practically no one lives in a Geodesic Dome. A few people do but they’re mostly over-age Hippies that wear Birkenstock Sandals (they don’t make Earth Shoes any more…I know, I was surprised too) and reek of musk and patchouli oil. 

I’m thinking perhaps the difficulty of hanging artwork on the curved walls posed to big of a problem with the dome. I’ve told people the Guggenheim was able to deal with it and they’re the Guggenheim for god’s sakes. Don’t misunderstand me, people love the dome for all sorts of things they just don’t want to live in one. Can’t forget the The U.S. Pavilion at EXPO. That was pretty darn impressive. It’s just that like most things at the Expo. Great on the reveal and fast to the fade.



As far as the Dymaxion Car goes, sorry to say, it was a no go, It was ingenious but frankly, it looked pretty silly. Silly is not something people want in an automobile. Kudos on the concept. As for execution, let’s just say it can be a bitch and your Dymaxion was one big bitch. And the name, Dymaxion, seriously. Maybe the Jetson drive a Dymaxion but real people drive Honda Accords.

You will be pleased to know I read your book, “Synergistics” when I was in college. I read the entire thing, cover to cover. I may be only the person to have done it. Wasn’t it about 600 pages or so? Not complaining but it was a challenge. Let’s me ask you something now that you’re dead. Did realize how painfully boring that book was? Not only couldn’t you absorb anything, the book actually sucked out any fragments of knowledge you may have picked up along the way.



Many people who are alive today remember you and your contributions to society, even if they can’t recall what they are. But for some reason people confuse you with Linus Pauling. I don’t know what that is all about.

Let me close with a surprise for you. I don’t know if you know this but your wife, Anne Hewitt, dropped dead two after you. Kind of interesting, no?
Kind of synergistic…or not.

Cheers,
Your Pal, Barry


My Mephetic Life
06.23.2012
www.mobuki.tumblr.com

Posted on Monday, June 25th 2012

Reblogged from My Mephetic Life